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St. Innocent Orthodox Church       

✙  Founded in 1967  ✙  Moscow Patriarchal Parishes  ✙                         
23300 W. Chicago    Redford, MI 48239     313-538-1142     Fax: 313-538-8126
Church Web Site: www.stinnocentchurch.org   E-Mail: frroman@firebirdvideos.com
St. Innocent Monastic Community: 9452 Hazelton, Redford, MI 48239  313-535-9080

PASTOR: Rt. Rev. Mitered Archpriest ROMAN STAR
      OCTOBER 19, 2014                        Dean, Central States Deanery, Patriarchal Parishes
Cell Phone: 313-319-0590
ASSISTANT PRIEST: Rev. DANEIL SHIRAK   313-295-3073
DEACON: Rev. Dn. Michael Comerford

EPISTLE:  2nd Corinthians 11:31 – 12:9 (#194)                         ATTACHED: Sister Ioanna
GOSPEL:  
St. Luke 8:5-15 (#35)                                    CHOIR DIRECTOR: Elizabeth Star
TONE:       
2                                                                       READERS: Robert Joseph Latsko

George Hanoian

 

✞ 19th SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST ✞

✞ 9:15 AM HOURS & AKATHIST TO ST LUKE; CONFESSIONS
✞ 10AM — DIVINE LITURGY OF ST. JOHN CHRYSOSTOM 

COMMEMORATED TODAY::  Prophet Joel (ca. 800 B.C.). Martyr Varus, and with him six Monk Martyrs (ca. 307). Translation of the Relics of Ven. John, Abbot of Rila in Bulgaria (1238). Bl. Cleopatra and her son John, in Egypt (327). Hieromartyr Sadoc (Sadoth), Bishop of Persia, and 128 Martyrs with him (342).

FOR THE REPOSE OF:  Estelle & Joseph Star; Ellen Starinshak; Anna & John Witkowski; Michael Sr.& Margaret Rusko; Mary, Andrew, Daniel, Michael & Lottie Yakuber; Ross & Margaret Falsetti; Helen, John & Carole Andrayko; Peter & Theresa Harvilla; Marc Dade; Betty Martell; Frances Smoly; Peter Glover; Irene Adams; Ethel Elizabeth & Wayne Joshua deVyver; David Horka; Michael Rusko, Anna Lichagina, Yelena & Zinaïda Korniyevskaya, Joseph Nossal, Michelle Tucker, Edwin Rusko

MEMORY ETERNAL

               Frank Martell, whose Anniversary of his repose is Friday, 24 October        
               Helen Andrayko, whose Anniversary of her repose is Friday, 24 October, by son, John Andrayko
               Anna Boray, whose Anniversary of her repose is Saturday,16 October

FOR THE  HEALTH OF:  Archimandrite Roman (Braga) (cancer); Archimandrite Il’ya (Barna); Igumen Seraphim; Archpriest Lawrence Bacik; Archpriest Paul Waters; Archpriest Serge Lukianov; Priest Daneil, Matushka Debra & Corrina Shirak; Deacon  Michael, Deacon Basil Frenchek (cancer); Matushka Mary Ellen & Julius Comerford; Matushka Melanya Sviridov; Matushka Mary Donahue; Reader Robert Latsko, Reader George & Betty Hanoian, Jordan Manier, Rose Nossal, Mary Glover, Nancy Cupp, Deborah Dade, Dean Hough, Vasiliki Stamoulis, Gerald Martell,  Jaime Truskowski, Azbehat, Donald Yakuber, Carl deVyver, Jo Anne Nicholas, Joan Rusko, Gregory & Tamiko Star, Daria, Mother Theodora-Ampilochia (cancer); Alice Ladhu (cancer); Helen Hall (cancer); Azbehat, (recovering from surgery)

ALSO FOR: Jason & Debra Truskowski, who celebrated their Anniversary last Sunday, 12 October
                       Nancy Cupp, who celebrates her birthday on Tuesday, 21 October
                       Julia Korniyevskaya, who celebrates her birthday on Tuesday, 21 October
                       Tatiana Kornievskaya, who celebrates her birthday on Friday, 24 October
                        Nick & Jo Anne Nicholas, safe travel in the Carribean

* MAY GOD GRANT THEM MANY YEARS! *

SCHEDULE FOR THE COMING WEEK

Wednesday  10/22     7pm      MOLEBEN
Saturday       10/25    10am     ST. DEMETRIUS SOUL SATURDAY MEMORIAL DIVINE LITURGY for the DEPARTED
                                      4pm      GREAT VESPERS & CONFESSIONS            
Sunday         10/26             21st  Sunday After Pentecost & Great Martyr St. Demetrius Feast                
                                 9:15am     Hours & Akathist & Confessions    
                                    10am     DIVINE LITURGY, followed by Parish Dinner (ca. 12 noon)

❈  CHRIST IS IN OUR MIDST!  ❈ HE IS NOW & EVER SHALL BE!  ❈

[PRINTED BULLETIN, PAGES 2 & 3]

THE DIVINE LITURGY:

A Commentary in the Light of the Fathers
By Hieromonk Gregorios
Koutloumousiou Monastery, Mount Athos, Greece
Translated by Elizabeth Theokritoff

What Is the Divine Liturgy?: A recapitulation of the entire divine economy

The totality of the wondrous events performed by God, in order to bring man after his disobedience back to His house and make him His own once more, is called divine economy or dispensation “The divine economy of our God and Savior is the raising up of man from his fallen state and his return from the alienation produced by his disobedience to intimacy with God.” (St Basil the Great, On the Holy Spirit, 15.35, PG 32.128C)

    This reality of our salvation in Christ is what we experience at every Divine Liturgy, for which we give thanks to God: “The awesome Mysteries which are performed at every assembly of the faithful and which offer salvation in abundance are called the Eucharist [‘thanksgiving’] because they consist of the recollection of many benefactions, and reveal to us the culmination of divine Providence.” The Divine Liturgy is the sacramental re-living of these things and the “recapitulation of the entire divine economy.” (St John Chrysostom, On Matthew, 25.3, PG 57.331; St Theodore the Studite, Antirrheticus, 1, PG 99.340C) That is why at the end of the Divine Liturgy of St Basil the celebrant says: “The Mystery of Your dispensation, O Christ our God has been accomplished and perfected.”

    The mystery of the divine economy was made manifest at the same time as man’s disobedience.  The Master who loves mankind “at once saw the fall and the magnitude of the wound, and hastened to treat the wound so that it would not grow and turn into an incurable injury...  Spurred on by His love, not for one moment did He cease to provide for man.” (St John Chrysostom, On Genesis, 17.2, PG 53.136.) Through wonderful deeds and prophetic words, God prepared man to partake in the fullness of life and love.

    A number of events and prophecies in the Old Testament foreshadow the Mystery of the Divine Eucharist.

    The first of these is the offering of bread and wine by Melchizedek (cf. Gen. 14:18-20), who was “a prefiguration and image of Christ, the true High Priest” [cf.  Ps. 109: 41], and his offering was an imitation of the Lord’s offering.  Melchizedek, “moved by a gift of prophecy, envisioned the future offering which would be made on behalf of the gentiles.  Therefore, in imitation of Christ who was to come, he glorified God, offering bread and wine.” (Melchizedek, whose name means ‘king of peace,’ blessed the patriarch Abraham after the latter returned from his victory over the king of Elam. Abraham offered Melchizedek a tithe of the spoils, and Melchizedek offered him bread and wine (cf. Heb. 7:2); St John of Damascus, On the Orthodox Faith, 4.86, PG 94.1149C; St John Chrysostom, On Melchizedek, 3, PG 56.261)  In the Holy Spirit, Melchizedek lives the future in the present, and imitates that which has not yet taken place.

    Another prefiguration of Christ’s sacrifice and the Divine Eucharist is the sacrifice of Isaac by Abraham (cf. Gen. 22:1-14), and the sacrifice performed by the Prophet Elijah (cf. 3 Kings  [1 Kings] 18:17-40).  Isaiah’s vision (cf. Isa. 6:1-7), too, has liturgical overtones: the Lord is seated on a throne, attended by Seraphim who sing the Thrice-Holy Hymn, while a sacrifice of incense is being offered.  According to the holy Fathers, a prophecy by the patriarch Jacob (cf. Gen. 49: 10-11) and another by the Prophet Malachi (cf.  Mal. 1:11) also refer to the Eucharist (Cf. St Justin, First Apology, 32, PG 6.377-380; cf St John Chrysostom, Against the Jews, 3.12, PG 48.902-3).

    The supreme event prefiguring the Divine Eucharist, however, was the feast of the Jewish Passover.  This feast was a continuous commemoration of the salvation of the Hebrews from the Egyptians and thanksgiving to God for His benefactions. The events that took place when the Hebrews escaped from Egypt were “fearful mysteries of profound significance.  And if the prefigurations were so fearful, how much more the reality... [For] the reality is that we eat Christ as our Passover!” (St John Chrysostom, On Ephesians, 23.2, PG 62.165-6.)

    All these events prepared the way for the coming of Christ. Having hitherto been foreshadowed in ways that were obscure, the Truth was made manifest in the fullness of time.  At the same instant, the true extent of the mystery of the divine economy was also made manifest, because Christ is the recapitulation of this mystery.

    In the Divine Liturgy, all the events of Christ's life are ritually enacted: “All the actions performed in the divine service are a [proto-] type of Christ’s saving Passion, His burial and His Resurrection ... and of the whole of His redeeming life on earth and the divine economy.” In the Liturgy, the celebrant stands “before the divine Altar” and “Praises the sacred and divine works of Jesus Christ... Then he performs the divine Mysteries and brings before our eyes all those things that he has previously extolled.” The life of Christ is revealed before our eyes, because “the entire mystagogy is like an integrated image of a body — that of the earthly life of the Savior.” (Theodore of Andida, On the Symbols of the Divine Liturgy, 1, PG 140.417A; St Dionysius the Areopagite, On the Church Hierarchy, 3.3.12, PG 3A41C-444A; St Nicholas Cabasilas, Comm.  Liturgy, 1, PG 150.372B.)

    St John Chrysostom writes that “things invisible are seen with the eye of faith.” (On the words “In the last days,” 2, PG 56.272.)  Let us listen, then, to this saint who in the Divine Liturgy perceived things unseen.

    The church where the Liturgy is celebrated is Bethlehem: “Let us hasten to Bethlehem [that is, to the church], which is the house of the spiritual Bread.”  In a little while, we shall take part in the Mystical Supper in the upper room in Zion, together with the disciples.  For in the Liturgy “that very same Supper at which Christ was present is accomplished.  The Eucharistic Supper does not differ from that Supper in anyway.” “This holy church is the upper room where Christ and the disciples were assembled; it was from here that they went out to the Mount of Olives.” (St John Chrysostom, On Matthew, 7.5, 50.3 and 82.5, PG 57.78, PG 58.507, 744)

    Later on, the Altar becomes the place of the skull, the terrible Golgotha: the Mystery of the Divine Eucharist “is a type of that sacrifice [on Golgotha]... The sacrifice that was offered then, we offer now too.” After Golgotha, we experience the Resurrection: “The Mystery we celebrate at Easter [Pascha] contains nothing additional to what we celebrate now.  It is one and the same, the same grace of the Holy Spirit.  It is always Easter [Pascha].” (Ibid. On Hebrews, 17.3, PG 63.131; On 1Timothy, 5.3, PG 62.529-30)

    The Divine Eucharist is the unceasing Passover of the Church. It is the beginning of the new age which erupts into the old and renews it. It is the charismatic presence of the kingdom which is to come: You left nothing undone until you had brought us back to heaven and granted us Your Kingdom that is to come. Christ has given us even now the Kingdom which is to come and “He has made heaven accessible.”  (Anaphora prayer; St John Chrysostom, On John, 46.3, PG 59.261)  And more awesome yet: He has accounted us worthy to receive within us the Master of heaven.

    The Divine Liturgy is the mystery of Christ.  In it, things near and things far, the beginning and the end, co-exist side by side: The Passover of the Lord appears, the ages are brought together [that is, differences of time are removed], heaven and the earthly world are made one.’ (Epistle to Diognetus, 12,9, ANF 1,p.30)  As Christ is Alpha and Omega, the first and last, the beginning and the end  (Rev. 22: 13), so the Divine Liturgy is the synaxis of space and time in Christ and their transfiguration into liturgical space and time.

[PRINTED BULLETIN, PAGE 4]

ON PRAYER
By Metropolitan Hilarion (Alfeyev), 25 August 2014

The following thirty-two part series on prayer was transcribed and translated from television episodes presented on Russian television in the spring of 1999 by Igumen (now Metropolitan) Hilarion (Alfeyev) with the blessing of His Holiness, the late Patriarch Alexy II of Moscow and All Russia.  Source: http://www.pravmir.com/prayer/

PART 4 (of 32): SHORT PRAYERS

People often ask: how should we pray, in what words, and in what language? Some even say: “I do not pray because I do not know how; I do not know any prayers.” One does not need any specialized skill for prayer. One can simply talk with God. At the divine services of the [Russian] Orthodox Church, we use a special language: Church Slavonic. But in private prayer, when we are alone with God, there is no need for any special languages. We can pray to God in the language we use when speaking with people, when thinking.
Prayer should be very simple. St. Isaac the Syrian said: “The whole fabric of your prayer should be succinct. One word saved the publican, and one word made the thief on the cross heir to the Heavenly Kingdom.”
Let us recall the parable of the Publican and the Pharisee: Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner (Luke 18:10-13). And this short prayer saved him. Let us also remember the thief who was crucified with Jesus and who said to Him: Lord, remember me when Thou comest into Thy kingdom (Luke 23:42). This alone was enough for him to enter Paradise.
Prayer can be extremely brief. If you are just starting out on your path of prayer, begin with very short prayers, such as can allow you to focus. God does not need words; He needs men’s hearts. Words are secondary; of paramount importance are the feeling and disposition with which we approach God. To approach God without a feeling of reverence or with distraction – when during prayer our mind wanders to the side – is much more dangerous than saying the wrong words in prayer. Distracted prayer has neither meaning nor value. A simple law is at work: if the words of prayer do not reach our heart, they will not reach God. As it is sometimes put, such prayer does not reach above the ceiling of the room in which we are praying, and it should reach the heavens. Therefore it is very important that each word of prayer should be felt deeply by us. If we are incapable of focusing on the long prayers contained in the prayer books of the Orthodox Church, try your hand at shorter prayers: “Lord, have mercy,” “Lord, save,” “Lord, help me,” “God, have mercy on me, a sinner.”
One ascetic struggler said that if we could, with the full force of our feelings – with all our heart and soul – just say the prayer “Lord, have mercy,” then that would be enough for salvation. But the problem is that, as a rule, we cannot say this with all our heart; we cannot say this with all our whole life. Therefore, in order to be heard by God, we tend to use many words.
Let us remember that God longs for our hearts, not for our words. If we will turn to Him with our whole hearts, then we will certainly get a response.

[PRINTED BULLETIN PAGE 5]

CANDLES FOR LAST SUNDAY, 12 OCTOBER
CHURCH VIGIL LAMPS:    
Royal Doors Lamp:In Memory of Husband Joe; Son Kenneth; parents Michael & Margaret Rusko & John & Martha Nossal, by Rose Nossal
Altar Candles: In Memory of Nicholas and Susan Yakuber, by son, Donald Yakuber        
Iconostasis Lamps: In Memory of Irene Adams, by daughter, Eileen Adams
Candles on the Solea: In Memory of Pete & Theresa Harvilla, Norman & Monica Holst, & Ricky Ellis, by Jason & Debra Truskowski    
Nave Reliquary-Icon Lamps: (1) In Memory of Ross & Margaret Falsetti, by daughters, Margie Martell & Rose Ann Everhardt
Nave Reliquary-Icon Lamps: (2) Anonymous
Table of Oblation LampIn Memory of parents, Helen & John Andrayko, Sr. & sister, Carole Andrayko, by John Andrayko, Jr.

N MEMORY OF (MEMORY ETERNAL!):                                        
Joseph & Estelle Star, by son Father Roman and family
Paul & Alexandra Yupco, Basil & Ellen Starinshak, by grandson, Father Roman and family
John & Anna Witkowski, by daughter, Matushka Rose Marie and family
Samuel & Mary Kupec, by granddaughter, Matushka Rose Marie and family
Parents, Helen & John Andrayko and sister, Carole Andrayko, by John Andrayko        
My husband, Joe; my sisters, Margaret & Ross Falsetti, Anna & Mike Elaschat, Theresa & Pete Harvilla, Irene, & brothers, Michael, John & Edwin (newly departed) Rusko; niece, Rose Mary Hough; Joe’s brothers, Raymond & Walter Nossal, & sisters, Theresa, Florence & Helen Nossal, by Rose Nossal
Pete & Theresa Harvilla, by Mary Ann Harvilla & Kay Truskowski  + + + My husband, Michael Rusko, by Joan Rusko
Parents, Ethel Elizabeth & Wayne Joshua deVyver; David Horka; Marion Pallas; Nina Isagholian; Fr. Photius Donahue; Mother Benedicta;, by Sister Ioanna
Thelma Ratcliff, Louis Pitts, T.F. Shelton, Gloria Robinson, Reginald Bell, Lessie Favor, Lois Hamby, by Manier Family

All family & Friends, by Rose Ann Everhardt  + + + Child Lana Wilson, Wendell Philips, by Becky J. & Levi

FOR THE HEALTH OF (MANY YEARS!):         
Elizabeth, Lawrence, Caitlin & Zachary, by parents & grandparents, Father Roman & Matushka Rose Marie
Gregory & Tamiko Star, by parents, Father Roman & Matushka Rose Marie        
Children & Grandchildren; Monk Fr. Tikhon (Dade); Dean Hough, by Rose Nossal
Father Roman & Matushka & family; Sister Ioanna; John Andrayko; Nancy; Mary G; Jo Anne N; Grandson Joey (in the Navy Reserves) & all people in the Armed Forces; & all the people of St. Innocent Church, by Rose  Nossal 

My Mom, Jaime Truskowski, by Kay Truskowski + + + Family & Friends, Aunt Rose, by Mary Ann Harvilla & Kay T. + + + Brother, Greg & Donna, Gregory & Liz & Alex, by Mary Ann Harvilla & Kay Truskowski

Archimandrites Roman, Nafanail & Gregory; Igumen Seraphim; Fr. Roman & Mat. Rose Marie; Fr. Lawrence & fam; Fr. Daneil & fam; Dcn. Michael & fam; Mat. Melanya S; Mat. Mary D; Carl; Fr. Tikhon; Sdn Andrew; Rdr Robert; Robert M; David Samuel & Sky; JoAnne & Nick; Martha; Athanasius; John A; Lena N; Jillian J; Ed & Tiffany; Vasiliki; Rose; Emil & Rozana; Mo.Theodora-Amphilochia; Azbehat, by Sister Ioanna 

Health of: Manier family, Samantha Ketelson (Infant w/ hypo-thyroidism) + + + Salvation of: Brittany, Eddie, Breonna, Bronte, Kaitlyn, RJ,  Xavier, Storie, Robert, Candice, Kevin, Cynthia, Demarion, Desmond, & Shelton Family, by Manier family

Joan Jurczyszyn, Betty Stelmaszek, Leia Wilson, Andrea Faust, Liz Tomachewski, Richard Bussen, by Becky Jurczyszyn & Levi         
All family & Friends, by Rose Ann Everhardt

PROSFORA FOR TODAY IS OFFERED by: John Andrayko
in Memory Eternal of: John’s mother, Helen Andrayko (3rd anniversary, October 24th); his dad, John Andrayko, Sr. (anniv., January 28th); his sister, Carole Andrayko (anniversary, June 5th); all departed members of the Andrayko & Mehalacki Families; Joe Nossal; friends & loved ones; and for the Health of: John Andrayko; Fr. Roman & Mat. Rose Marie; Rose Nossal & all parishioners; & all family & friends.

 PROSFORA SCHEDULE:  2014 —  October: John Andrayko: November: Sr. Ioanna; December: Nicholas Family.

 PROSFORA SCHEDULE: 2015: January: John Andrayko & Sister Ioanna; February: Matushka Rose Marie; March: Libby Glover-Booher; April: Deborah Hartz; May: Vasiliki Stamoulis; June: John Andrayko; July: Matushka Rose Marie; August: Sister Ioanna; September: Deborah Hartz; October: John Andrayko; November: Sister Ioanna; December: Nicholas Family.  The 2015 Prosfora Schedule is now complete. Thank you to the donors.

Offering the Holy Bread that will become the Sacred Body of Christ and received in Holy Communion is a great honor and privilege, and it is a wonderful way to commemorate one’s living and departed loved ones. It also is a very meaningful way of celebrating special events, such as birthdays & anniversaries, graduations, weddings, births & baptisms.  Donations are $25 for a month.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

(1)   MAKE SURE YOU PLAN TO ATTEND OUR FALL PARISH POT-LUCK DINNER, SUN., OCT. 26, AFTER LITURGY     Please contact Mary Ann Harvilla to confirm that you are coming.

PLEASE NOTE: IN OUR PRINTED BULLETIN WE HAVE BEEN CALLIING THIS DINNER "OUR FALL PARISH POT-LUCK DINNER," SO THAT FR. ROMAN WON'T KNOW WHAT IT REALLY IS.  IN REALITY IT IS A GALA, FESTIVE 30TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY FOR HIM. HE DOESN'T HAVE A COMPUTER, SO HERE, ON-LINE, WE CAN SAY WHAT IT REALLY IS. THIS IS A SUPER MAJOR CELEBRATION (NOT A PARISH SPAGHETTI DINNER) OF FR. ROMAN'S 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS ORDINATION, HIS 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS SERVING AS PASTOR OF ST. INNOCENT, AND IS ALSO CELEBRATING HIS 30 YEARS OF SERVING  THE  ORTHODOX COMMUNITY OF METRO-DETROIT, SOUTHERN MICHIGAN AND THE ENTIRE PATRIARCHAL PARISHES. [THINK OF THIS AS BEING EQUIVALENT TO A 50TH ANNIVERSARY, BECAUSE IF FR. ROMAN HAD BEEN ORDAINED WHEN HE WAS 26 — AS IS COMMON — RATHER THAN 46, THIS WOULD BE HIS 50TH ANNIVERSARY.] IN  ADDITION TO ALL OF OUR PARISHIONERS, WE EXPECT TO HAVE  MANY PEOPLE FROM OUTSIDE THE PARISH, INCLUDING CLERGY WHO WILL COME AFTER THEIR OWN SERVICES ARE OVER. SO WE MIGHT HAVE AS MANY AS 75 PEOPLE.

ALSO, WE  PLAN TO PRESENT FR. ROMAN WITH A BIG BASKET OF CARDS. SO PLEASE HAVE A CARD FOR HIM (A 'THANK YOU' OR 'CONGRATULATIONS' CARD, OR WHATEVER IS APPROPRIATE FOR YOU), HOPEFULLY WITH A PERSONAL MESSAGE EXPRESSING YOUR APPRECIATION FOR WHAT HE HAS DONE FOR YOU AND YOUR LIFE.

THE PARISH IS ALSO PLANNING TO PRESENT HIM WITH A GROUP GIFT, APPROPRIATE FOR SUCH A MOMENTOUS OCCASION, FOR WHICH YOUR DONATION — OF WHATEVER YOU CAN AFFORD — WILL ENABLE US TO PAY FOR. AFTER THE MEAL WE WILL HAVE A SHORT PROGRAM. IF ANYONE HAS A PERSONAL GIFT, WE WOULD WELCOME YOU PRESENTING IT DURING OUR PROGRAM, ALONG WITH A FEW COMMENTS THAT YOU MAY WISH TO MAKE. IF YOU CANNOT BE HERE, DUE TO DISTANCE OR PHYSICAL INFIRMITY, PLEASE SEND A CARD AND MESSAGE TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR BASKET OF CARDS. (SEND TO: Sister Ioanna, St. Innocent  Monastic Community, 9452 Hazelton, Redford, MI  48239-1138)

WE HAVE ONLY 1 WEEK LEFT, AND WE  NEED A HEAD-COUNT, SO PLEASE LET MARY ANN HARVILLA (mary_harvilla@tapcoint.com) AND/OR SISTER IOANNA (sisterioanna@firebirdvideos.com) KNOW: (1) THAT YOU ARE COMING, AND HOW MANY OF YOU; (2) HOW MUCH FOR A GROUP-GIFT DONATION YOU CAN GIVE; (3) AND THAT YOU WILL BRING A PERSONAL CARD. IF YOU ARE PHYSICALLY CAPABLE OF BEING HERE, PLEASE DO SO, BECAUSE THAT IS THE NUMBER ONE BEST WAY OF EXPRESSING YOUR APPRECIATION TO FR. ROMAN FOR HIS 30 YEARS OF SACRIFICIAL LABORS ON OUR BEHALF.

(2) OUR NEXT MONTHLY POT-LUCK & DISCUSSION GROUP MEETS TODAY, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19th.

Our monthly pot-luck lunch and discussion group that has been meeting monthly since June, will continue to meet for fellowship and a lively, thought-provoking discussion following a casual pot-luck lunch, on one Sunday (2nd or 3rd) a month after coffee hour, at the St. Innocent Monastic Community. The fellowship, discussion and food are all most enjoyable and pleasant. The next gathering is TODAY, SUNDAY, October 19th. The November gathering will be on November 9th. All are welcome. Mark your calendars.

(3) TOMORROW, MONDAY, 10/20, FR. ROMAN TO GIVE PRESENTATION AT ST. THOMAS, FARM. HILLS
Tomorrow evening, October 20th at 7:00 pm, Fr. Roman will give a presentation about the life of St. Maria of Paris, the “Rebel Nun.” St. Maria is a woman of our own times, having been martyred in the Nazi death ovens in 1945. Having been glorified as a saint just a few years ago, her icon adorns our rear narthex wall. Come and support our priest and hear about the fascinating life of a rather controversial nun. Monthly OCW presentation at St. Thomas Albanian Church, 10 Mile Rd, east of Middlebelt, Farmington Hills. All are welcome –  men, women, teens.

(4) NEEDS LIST: THE PARISH NEEDS TO REPLENISH SOME BASIC KITCHEN SUPPLIES
It is time to replenish some of our basic kitchen, coffee hour and other supplies. These are the things needed: Coffee (regular), dairy creamer (liquid, refrigerated type), cases of water (16 oz.), SOS scouring pads, take-out containers, dispenser paper towels (these are a special type to fit our dispensers in the bathrooms). Options: (a) buy the items, or (b) donate money & Matushka will buy them.

(5) PLEASE BRING IN WINTER CLOTHES FOR THE NEEDY — COATS, HATS, GLOVES, SCARVES, SWEATERS
Don’t bring in any more summer clothing. But please bring in things for the winter: coats, hats, gloves/mittens, scarves, sweaters, boots. Most things that are donated are brought to the Redford Interfaith Relief, with which Fr. Roman is very involved. They help people right here in our own community. The people are screened, so you know that they need what they receive.
            
(6) PLEASE CONTINUE TO GIVE YOUR DONATIONS FOR OUR ON-GOING ANNUAL BLANKET DRIVE
        
❈  GLORY TO JESUS CHRIST!  ❈  GLORY FOREVER!  ❈

[PRINTED BULLETIN PAGE 6]

SCHEDULE OF UP-COMING SERVICES, FEASTS & EVENTS
(In addition to regular weekly: 7pm Wednesday Service; 4pm Saturday Great Vespers; 10am Sunday Liturgy)

Sunday, October 19th, After Coffee-Hour (1:00), Monthly Pot-Luck, Fellowship & Discussion #5, at St. Innocent Monastic Community

Tomorrow, Monday, October 20th, 7pm, "Rebel Nun: St. Maria of Paris, OCW
Saturday, October 25th, 10am, ST. DEMETRIUS SOUL-SATURDAY MEMORIAL LITURGY FOR THE DEPARTED
Sunday, October 26th,
PARISH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION DINNER. Please contact Mary Ann Harvilla that you are coming
Saturday, November 1st, Daylight Savings Time ends; Change clocks 1 hour back before going to bed

Sunday, November 9th, After Coffee-Hour (1:00), Monthly Pot-Luck, Fellowship & Discussion #6, at St. Innocent Monastic Community
Saturday, November 15th, NATIVITY FAST BEGINS (abstain from meat, fish, dairy products (milk & cheese, etc.)
Thursday, November 20th, 7pm, GREAT VESPERS & LITIYA, for the ENTRANCE OF THE THEOTOKOS INTO THE TEMPLE
Friday, November 21st, 9am, DIVINE LITURGY, for the Great Feast, the ENTRANCE OF THE THEOTOKOS INTO THE TEMPLE
                                     7pm, FOCUS Motor City Benefit Dinner & Auction (6:30 Hors d’Oeuvres), $75 donation; St. Mary’s,

Saturday, Nov. 22nd, 10am, “Why Bad Things Happen to Good People?”, OCW Presentation by Fr. Laurence Lazar, St. Mary’s, Berkley
Wednesday, November 26th, 9am, DIVINE LITURGY FOR PARISH PATRONAL FEASTDAY OF ST. INNOCENT OF IRKUTSK

Wednesday, November 26th, 7pm, COCC-sponsored Moleben for Thanksgiving, at St. George Romanian Cathedral, Southfield
Thursday, November 27th, 10am, DIVINE LITURGY FOR THANKSGIVING DAY

 

FR. ROMAN’S ADDITIONAL SCHEDULE

Tomorow, Monday, October 20th, 7pm, Give OCW presentation, St. Maria of Paris, the “Rebel Nun,” at St. Thomas Albanian Church, Farm. Hills

Saturday & Sunday, November 1st & 2nd, St. Nicholas Church, Brookside (Birmingham), AL; Vespers (Sat.) & Liturgy (Sun.), Dean’s Visitation

Saturday, November 8th, 6pm,  30th Anniversary Celebration of the Enthronement of Abp. Nathaniel, St. George Rom. Cath., Southfield

Thursday, November 13th, 10am, Divine Liturgy & lunch, Clergy Brotherhood Patronal Feast celebration, St. Mark’s, Rochester Hills
Friday, November 14th, 11:00am, Bishop’s Council Meeting, at St. Nicholas Cathedral, NYC, fly early morning & return same evening

Tuesday & Wednesday, November 18th & 19th, Central States Deanery Meeting, at St. Michael’s Church, Redford
Saturday & Sunday, November 22nd- 23rd, Nativity of Christ Church, Youngstown, OH; Vespers (Sat.) & Liturgy (Sun.), Dean’s Visitation
Friday & Saturday, November 28th-29th, St. John Chrysostom, Grand Rapids, Vespers & Presentation (Fri.) & Liturgy (Sat.), Dean’s
Visitation

 

ORTHODOX NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD:

CANONICAL CHURCH CAPTURED IN WESTERN UKRAINE

Moscow, October 3, Interfax — Fifty people of sporty appearance backed up by local militia officers captured Orthodox church of the Protection of Our Lady in the town of Turka, the Lvov Region, Ukraine, the Natsionalny Kontrol (The National Control) magazine reports at its website.

A local priest suffered physical injuries, the church was closed, parishioners were exiled. According to the edition, there were Greek Catholics among the attackers.

The article notes that the first threats to the believers have been voiced in spring. Late in March, a local individual businessman came up to the church rector Archpriest Alexy Sloboda and demanded that the church should join the self-proclaimed "Kiev Patriarchate." However, the priest refused.

On June 29, when Father Alexy was celebrating the Divine Liturgy, ten allies of the "Kiev Patriarchate" rushed into the church. They attacked the priest and dropped him. Afterwards, the medicolegal investigation proved that the priest had soft tissue bruises.

On September 28, group of 50 people burst onto the church territory to capture church premises. The church was locked, and the passage to the church was blocked. About 50 militiamen gathered near the church, but they did not interfere.

Orthodox believers (300 people, mostly old ones) tried to deploy and open their church, but faced tough response from the invaders and militia officers. The latter accused the believers in provoking "a conflict situation." They did not pay any attention that the believers had all necessary legal documents: a certificate on registration of the Orthodox community, the ownership documents.

The same evening, when believers again came to their church to hold vespers, no one was allowed to the church territory. Moreover, one of the invaders threw a bottle of water to Hieromonk Vladimir (Kozanchin's) head and bruised his face.

On October 1, the believers addressed a complaint to the Lvov Regional Administration, however their application was not accepted.

Two weeks before, a building in Hieromonk Vladimir (Kozanchin's) hermitage was set on fire. This hermitage was built by Priest Yaroslav Yavorsky who became a widower with six children. Father Yaroslav's wife died of cancer and he started building the hermitage on his own money.